WEOS Station News

New Events Calendar is now live!

As of today, 5/25/16, WEOS has a new events Calendar. The link on the top of the page or by going directly to will get you to the calendar. There are some differences, but you can submit your events as before. Be sure to read the submission guidelines at the bottom of the form.
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Artist Georgia O'Keeffe didn't spend her entire career painting large, lavish flowers.

The curator of the Georgia O'Keeffe Museum in Santa Fe, N.M., says that comes as a surprise to many people. Now, the museum has purchased The Barns, Lake George, a rarely-seen 1926 abstract painting that makes the point and helps the institution tell more of her story.

"Look!" says Stefania Poggi. "They've made inflatable rafts."

Two dozen boys are splashing in a massive, muddy pool surrounded by 30-foot-tall earthen banks. They're jumping on grain sacks that they've filled with plastic bottles to make them float.

Poggi manages the Doctors Without Borders operation in the largest refugee camp in South Sudan.

The 35-year-old Italian is standing on the banks of the drainage ditch, which was bulldozed through the middle of the camp to alleviate flooding.

A slaughterhouse is a safer place to work than it used to be, according to a new government report. But data gathered by federal regulators doesn't likely capture all the risks faced by meat and poultry workers.

Shareholders of Exxon Mobil and Chevron have voted to reject a series of resolutions aimed at encouraging the companies to take stronger actions to battle climate change.

But Exxon Mobil shareholders voted in favor of a rule that could make it easier for minority shareholders to nominate outsiders to the company's board, a potential victory for environmentalists.

Activist shareholders at both companies had placed an unusual number of resolutions on the ballot related to climate change.

Stanton Gleave hardly fits the stereotype of a modest, keep-to-himself Western rancher.

Standing in a collection of muddy pens taking a break from shearing sheep near his home in tiny Kingston, Utah, Gleave gives an earful about his frustrations with the Bureau of Land Management and environmental groups.

"That's who we're actually fighting with," says Gleave. "They've indoctrinated and got into this BLM and Forest Service 'til a lot of 'em are right up in the head positions now."

U.S.-backed forces have launched offensives on two areas of strategic importance to the Islamic State: Fallujah, Iraq, and an area north of Raqqa, the de facto IS capital in Syria.

This week, Here & Now has been speaking with 2016 college graduates about the biggest challenges they faced in school, and where they plan to go next.

Today, Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Peace Odiase, one of two valedictorians at Fisk University, a historically black college in Nashville, Tennessee.

If your child is taking medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), their doctor may soon offer a new option: fruit-flavored chewables.

The new drug, Adzenys, got FDA approval in January, and went on the market last week. But some psychiatrists are concerned that making amphetamines in a candy-like form will make people more likely to abuse them, and also contribute to what some see as a trend of overmedicating children.

Here & Now’s Robin Young talks with Meghana Keshavan, biotech correspondent at STAT.

The Senate voted yesterday to block a new rule issued by the Obama Administration that requires brokers to act in the best interest of their clients when it comes to retirement accounts.

Before the rule change, they were required to make sure that investments were “suitable,” for clients, which was a lower standard. Republicans have supported blocking the rule, while President Obama has promised to veto the Senate bill so that the rule stands.

Here & Now’s Robin Young discusses the situation with CNN’s Maggie Lake.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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