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HWS President Gregory Vincent: Be an Engaged Citizen

The last time we spoke with Hobart and William Smith President Gregory Vincent, he was in his first week with the Colleges . Since that time, events off campus have given him reason the address the campus community via email over issues of affirmative action in higher education and larger issues of equality and justice after the events in Charlottesville. We asked President Vincent back into the studio to talk about those issues and to look ahead a bit to the upcoming start to his first academic year.

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The last time we spoke with Hobart and William Smith President Gregory Vincent, he was in his first week with the Colleges. Since that time, events off campus have given him reason the address the campus community via email over issues of affirmative action in higher education and larger issues of equality and justice after the events in Charlottesville. We asked President Vincent back into the studio to talk about those issues and to look ahead a bit to the upcoming start to his first academic year.

Former 2010 gubernatorial candidate and Buffalo businessman Carl Paladino has been removed from the Buffalo Board of Education in a ruling by the state education commissioner issued Thursday.

Governor Cuomo on Sunday released the following statement calling on President Trump to denounce white supremacists and is asking all concerned New Yorkers and others to sign a petition.

The abundance of rain this spring and summer has boosted the growth of local honeybee hives, but a menacing mite is continuing to cause havoc.

Experts are urging local beekeepers to check their hives now and every three weeks for the varroa mite.  The tiny parasite is posing a serious threat to New York's honeybee population, which was reduced 44 percent last year.         

Throughout their lives, and even from one generation to the next, African and American and Latino residents of the 9-county Rochester region fare much worse than their white counterparts when it comes to everything from health and education to wages and home ownership.

A wide range of data reflecting these glaring gaps is outlined in a report released today by ACT Rochester and the Rochester Area Community Foundation.


NPR recently released its list of the top 150 music albums by women of all time. Joni Mitchell's Blue topped the list, inspiring the Smith Opera House in Geneva to celebrate with a tribute concert. One of the themes of Blue is women's reaction to the issues of the countercultural 1960s.

We discuss those themes and debate which albums deserved higher billing with our guests:

New Yorkers who sign up for insurance under the Affordable Care Act exchanges for individuals will see their premiums rise by an average of 14 percent, now that the Cuomo administration has approved rate increases for insurers in the exchanges.

Part of the increase is due to worries and uncertainties over the future of the ACA, also known as Obamacare.

Transgender New Yorkers should now have a greater chance of getting medical services covered by insurance.

New York State has issued a letter that says insurance companies cannot deny a claim because a consumer identifies as a gender not typically associated with a service.

This letter comes from the NYS Dept. of Financial Services after it got word that some health insurance companies were denying claims from transgender consumers.

Jim Marshall / countryjoe.com

This week marks the 48th anniversary of the Woodstock Music & Art Fair. On August 16, 1969, Country Joe McDonald took the stage for what would be one of his two appearances. Unlike a lot of his fellow musicians who perfored at Woodstock, Country Joe is still going strong. He just released a new album called 50, that’s been featured all summer on the program Stuck in the Psychedelic Era. The program’s host, The Hermit, also had a conversation with Country Joe.


There’s growing pressure on a group of breakaway Democrats in the state Senate to reunite with the mainstream Democrats and form a majority to rule the Senate.

At a rally in Harlem, many of the state’s top African-American politicians, chanting “Andrea, Andrea,” voiced their support for the current leader of Senate Democrats, Andrea Stewart-Cousins, to become the majority leader of the Senate.

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