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Kelly Walker / Finger Lakes Public Radio

Signs and Signifiers Opens in Davis Gallery at Houghton House

On a recent weekday afternoon on the Hobart and William Smith Colleges campus, students, faculty and staff gathered to help a visiting print artist install his work. They were on the lawn outside Houghton House where a pair of telephone poles had been sunk into the ground and a broad panel was being raised on a large boom lift.

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The fallout continues from President Donald Trump’s decision to end subsidies to health insurance companies to help lower-income Americans pay for their health insurance. But it’s still unclear what the exact impact will be in New York.

As soon as the president followed through with his threat to end the subsidies, New York and several other states filed a lawsuit to try to get the money back. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said it will sow dysfunction in the state’s and the nation’s health care system.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo joined other New York Democrats in condemning the federal tax overhaul plan in the wake of Vice President Mike Pence’s visit to western New York.

Cuomo, also speaking in Buffalo where the vice president was attending a fundraiser for Rep. Chris Collins, said a provision in the tax overhaul to eliminate deductibility for state and local taxes would deliver a “death blow” to New York. He said it would result in “double taxation” and be a windfall for other states at New York’s expense.

A wide variety of groups have spent over $1.3 million dollars to urge voters to vote no on  holding a Constitutional Convention. The opponents have far outspent a smaller number of advocates who urge a "yes" vote on the November ballot.  

The more than 150-member coalition opposing a constitutional convention includes labor unions, and the state’s Conservative Party, which often opposes unions. Also against the convention- both pro and anti abortion groups, environmentalists and gun rights organizations.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman is going to court to fight President Donald Trump’s decision to end subsidies for low-income Americans who get their health care through the Affordable Care Act health exchanges.

Schneiderman said ending the subsidies is an attempt by Trump to “blow up” the nation’s health care system.

“His effort to cut these subsides with no warning or even a plan to contain the fallout is breathtakingly reckless,” Schneiderman said.

The state comptroller has announced that New York is joining 28 other states in offering a program that will help parents with disabled children save money for their future.

The program is modeled on the college savings program, which also is operated by the comptroller’s office. It allows an account to be set up in the name of any New Yorker who is diagnosed with a disability before the age of 26.

Rochester and Buffalo are hoping that two cities are better than one, when it comes to trying to attract major investment from the online behemoth Amazon.

In September, the company said it needed to build a second corporate headquarters, a project that would see the company spend more than $5 billion and hire as many as 50,000 employees.

A number of communities across the country are vying for that new Amazon facility, and Rochester officials already said they are interested, as did people in Buffalo.

Kelly Walker / Finger Lakes Public Radio


On a recent weekday afternoon on the Hobart and William Smith Colleges campus, students, faculty and staff gathered to help a visiting print artist install his work. They were on the lawn outside Houghton House where a pair of telephone poles had been sunk into the ground and a broad panel was being raised on a large boom lift.

The wildfires that are ravaging parts of Northern California are also impacting the large wine industry in that region. News of that devastation is on the mind of a Finger Lakes winemaker.

New Yorkers have the power on Nov. 7 to decide whether some state officials convicted of a felony should be stripped of their pensions.

But the proposal would not apply to two former legislative leaders and several former associates of Gov. Andrew Cuomo who are accused of corruption.

The ballot proposition before voters on Election Day would allow a judge to determine whether a state official convicted of crimes like bribery or bid-rigging should lose all or part of their pension.

Some of the state’s top-ranking education officials are condemning a vote by a State University of New York committee that would weaken regulations for teachers at some charter schools.

The controversial proposal approved by the SUNY Charter Schools Committee is slightly different than an earlier one. Now, instead of requiring as little as 30 hours of classroom experience in order to be eligible to teach in a charter school, 40 hours are required, as part of a total of 160 hours of classroom related instruction.

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