WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

News from Finger Lakes Public Radio

National Women's Hall of Fame Welcomes New Inductees

The National Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls celebrated their 2017 Induction Weekend this past weekend. 10 women were inducted at a ceremony on the campus of New York State Chiropractic College on Saturday including athlete and actor Aimee Mullins.

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Area Records & Music

Area Records & Music has been a beloved part of Geneva's downtown since 1977. Last week, owner Mikel George announced the business would be closing its doors. A liquidation sale begins on September 15 and will continue until the inventory is gone.

Last year, George talked to the Geneva Historical Society for their Music in the Key of Geneva podcast.

Kelly Walker / Finger Lakes Public Radio



The Finger Lakes is experiencing a great deal of growth as a dining destination. A lot of the recent attention has been focused on Geneva, but there are restaurants of all kinds opening everywhere including just down the road in Waterloo. West Main Kitchen has become a popular destination, especially for breakfast. Now, the team behind that restaurant has opened their new concept, Stan’s Waterloo. Brendan Spiro describes it as modern tavern cuisine that takes advantage of the abundant agricultural resources in the region.

Hobart and William Smith Colleges


Students arriving at Hobart and William Smith Colleges for the first time this week received advice from NPR’s Laura Sydell including a charge to take advantage of the Colleges’ study abroad program.

Bob Duffy has a new role, in addition to his regular job as president of the Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce.

It was announced at a meeting of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council on Wednesday that Duffy has been appointed Co-Chair of the council effective immediately.

He replaces Danny Wegman, Chairman of Wegmans Food Markets, who served as Co-Chair since the council’s inception in 2011.  Duffy joins MCC President Anne Kress, who is still the other Co-Chair of the council.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s health commissioner received a grilling from state senators at a hearing this week on whether New York is doing enough to combat tick-borne illnesses.

Health Commissioner Howard Zucker told the senators that this year, there are fewer deer ticks and fewer reported cases of Lyme disease in the state.

But, he said, the number of Lone Star ticks is up. They can carry diseases such as Rocky Mountain spotted fever and even cause someone to become allergic to eating red meat.

A new report from the New York State Comptroller’s office highlights the economic profile of the Finger Lakes region

Speaking from the Wine and Culinary Center in Canandaigua, State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli presented the findings based on the nine county area.

The report confirmed some numbers that weren’t all that surprising unfortunately. The City of Rochester has one of the lowest median household income rates at just over $30,000 a year, and more than half of the children in many rural areas and the City of Rochester live in poverty.

NPR


NPR’s Laura Sydell was the keynote speaker at Hobart and William Smith’s annual Convocation yesterday. The event marks the official beginning of the academic year. The keynote speaker’s remarks are generally directed to incoming first-year students. Sydell reflected on changes in the media landscape.

A former EPA administrator and a former New York state health department official have teamed up with a Vermont college to conduct a health survey of people potentially affected by polluted water in the villages of Hoosick Falls and Petersburgh, and in Bennington, Vermont.

Judith Enck was the EPA regional administrator during the Obama administration who first warned Hoosick Falls residents in the fall of 2015 not to drink the water in their village because it was contaminated with PFOA, a chemical used in plastics manufacturing for decades in the area.

The Literacy Volunteers of Ontario Yates hosts their annual Behind the Wines fundraiser Wednesday night, August 30 to support the services they provide.

“LVOY is trying to get the point where everybody is reading better. They serve immigrant populations. They have a strong ESL program, but they also serve people who grew up here and never learned to read.”

A left-leaning group is asking the state’s top politicians to give back donations from a hedge fund manager who made racially charged comments against New York’s only black female legislative leader. But so far, most — including Gov. Andrew Cuomo — have held on to the money.

Daniel Loeb, the founder and chief executive of the multi-billion-dollar hedge fund Third Point LLC, received attention when, in a Facebook post, he compared the leader of the state Senate Democrats, Andrea Stewart-Cousins, to the Ku Klux Klan.

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