WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

News from Finger Lakes Public Radio

The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. at Keuka College
Keuka College

Keuka College to Hold Listening Event for MLK Speech

On June 16th, 1963 the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. delivered the Baccalaureate Address at Keuka College. A recording of that speech was uncovered recently and will be shared at a listening event tonight. A public discussion will follow led by Dr. James K. Evans of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. Dr. Evans believes the message of the speech resonates 55 years later in an increasingly polarized society.

Read More

Flu cases on the rise statewide

Dec 19, 2017

The state Health Department says influenza is now prevalent in New York state, which means health care workers who haven't had a flu shot must wear procedural masks around patients.

Health Commissioner Dr. Howard Zucker says everyone over 6 months old is encouraged to get a flu shot.

The agency says there have been over 1,800 confirmed cases of influenza in 54 counties.

Governor Andrew Cuomo's proposal to toughen gun control laws for those convicted of domestic violence crimes is getting praise from a local advocate for abuse victims.

The legislation, the first 2018 priority unveiled by Cuomo, would require the mandatory surrender of firearms by anyone convicted of domestic violence-related charges, including misdemeanors.

A ceremony to award economic development grants to regions of the state was overshadowed by developments on the federal tax overhaul plan in Washington, as the House and Senate announced agreement on a final plan to be voted on as early as next week.

(WXXI News & AP) Communities in New York state are splitting $755 million in state economic development funding.

State officials announced the awards Wednesday at an event in Albany. The money will support hundreds of local economic development efforts, including job training, subsidies for expanding businesses and funding for community organizations.

This year's big winners include central New York, the Mohawk Valley, the Albany region, the mid-Hudson Valley and Long Island, which each received more than $80 million.

Cuomo: Remove firearms from domestic abusers in New York

Dec 19, 2017

ALBANY, N.Y. (AP)  Gov. Andrew Cuomo says he wants to take away all firearms from New Yorkers who are convicted of domestic violence crimes. 

The Democrat announced the plan Wednesday as the first of the proposals he'll unveil next month during his State of the State address that opens the 2018 legislative session. 

Under Cuomo's proposal, all guns would immediately be removed from anyone convicted of domestic violence crimes, including misdemeanors. He says his legislation would add measures aimed at keeping domestic violence perpetrators from obtaining firearms. 

Assembly GOP leader running for governor

Dec 13, 2017

There’s now one official candidate running for governor of New York in 2018, and that’s the Assembly’s Republican leader, Brian Kolb.

He announced his plans in a video released Tuesday.

Kolb, who’s been an Assembly member since 2000, is also a businessman. He’s the founder and past president of two companies in the Rochester area, where he grew up. Kolb said he’d draw on the experiences of both worlds if he were to lead the state.

He said he’s been traveling and meeting with New Yorkers and asking them whether state government is working for them. 

At an event that’s become increasingly rare in state politics, two politicians from opposing parties sat down together and had a civil discussion about issues facing New York.

Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner, a Democrat, and Republican state Sen. John DeFrancisco spoke in Albany during a forum about state issues and politics. 

“To have a vibrant civic dialogue is important,” said Miner. “The fact that it’s been missing, we’ve all suffered for it.”

DeFrancisco, who also is from Syracuse, agreed.

The deputy leader of the state Senate said 2018 will be a difficult year for balancing the state budget.

Sen. John DeFrancisco, R-Syracuse, predicted cutbacks in health care spending to help close a multibillion-dollar deficit.

DeFrancisco said the state’s $4.4 billion projected deficit, combined with potential effects of the federal tax overhaul on New York, will make the next state budget the most difficult one in at least seven years.

“It’s going to be a horrible budget,” DeFrancisco said.

Last January, a day after the inauguration of President Trump, an estimated 10,000 people flocked to Seneca Falls for a women’s march and rally.

Organizers are planning a similar event on January 20, 2018.

Rev. Leah Ntuala, pastor of the First Presbyterian Church of Seneca Falls, says the call to action has not diminished since last year.

"(This) year, I think everybody was worried about what possible changes the administration could make that would roll back rights women had made ground in getting and maintaining, and (now) we've realized some of those fears."

County leaders across New York are the latest to complain about the tax overhaul plan now being crafted in Congress. They predict higher taxes for many New Yorkers, declining home prices, and slowed economic growth.

Albany County Executive Dan McCoy says the federal tax bill will lead to many middle and upper class New Yorkers paying higher taxes, because of the proposed end to state and local tax deductions. And he says the state’s over $4 billion dollar projected deficit and potential funding cuts isn’t helping either.

“Brace yourselves,” McCoy said.

Pages