WEOS Finger Lakes Public Radio

Anders Kelto

A couple of weeks ago, our global health team was stumped by a final question on Jeopardy!: "After the secession of South Sudan from Sudan in 2011, this became the largest country in Africa by area."

We thought maybe it was Nigeria.

Or the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Or South Africa.

Wrong and wrong and wrong.

The correct answer: Algeria.

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Leading Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump made headlines this week by saying he wants to ban Muslims from entering the United States. He previously said he would "strongly consider" shutting down some mosques in the U.S.

Imagine picking up the U.S. and dropping it into a different part of the world. How would its record of gun deaths compare to its neighbors?

Pope Francis is often seen as a champion of the downtrodden. He frequently speaks about poverty and the injustice of inequality.

During his upcoming visit to Africa — from Nov. 25 to 30 — he'll visit three countries with high rates of poverty and rapidly growing economies: Kenya, Uganda and the Central African Republic.

His presence is certain to attract a lot of attention. But will his visit benefit poor people in these countries? What kind of difference, if any, can a visit from the pope make?

You're at the grocery store, shopping for Thanksgiving dinner. You've grabbed sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts and cans of pumpkin. If you're from the Midwest like I am, you're also gearing up for green bean casserole.

But when you approach a refrigerated section of the store piled high with turkeys, you're suddenly inundated with labels: natural, fresh, no hormones, young, premium and so on. Pretty soon, your head is spinning, so you grab the nearest one. As you head to the checkout line, you wonder if you've just made an ethical choice or been duped.



On a recent episode of What's Up Africa, comedian Ikenna Azuike is pointing out a statement by Tunisian transportation minister Mahmoud Romdhane that wearing a hijab reduces hearing by 30 percent and is therefore dangerous.

When Sani Muntari was 2 years old, he loved to run around and play games with his older siblings and cousins.

They lived in Sokoto, a hot, dusty city in northern Nigeria known for its deep Islamic roots. Sometimes, Muntari would go with his mother to the central market where she worked as a trader, peddling everything from vegetables to T-shirts to soap.

The Lasker Award, given for outstanding contributions to medicine and medical research, is sometimes referred to as "America's Nobel Prize." Since the award was established in 1945, more than 80 laureates have gone on to win the Nobel.

The medical aid group Medicins Sans Frontieres (Doctors Without Borders) is one of four recipients this year, accepting the award for its contributions to the fight against Ebola. I spoke with the president of the U.S. Board of Directors, Dr. Deane Marchbein, who was in New York for the presentation.

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